Smoking Bans in Cities

Smoking bans in public places may be becoming less controversial as the studies about secondhand smoke come in.  CBS News reported today on a study regarding a workplace ban on smoking in Pueblo, Colorado. Reportedly, there was a 41 percent reduction in heart attack hospitalizations three years after a workplace ban went into effect.

I’ve concluded that anyone who smokes is either stupid or addicted to tobacco – and for the record I was stupid for about 15 years of my life.  The reason that I say that is that no (non-stupid) person would choose to smoke given the overwhelming evidence of its harmful effects.  The only other reason for smoking is that the person is addicted.  I know that sounds harsh, but can anyone give a sound reason for smoking?  Having said that, as long as smoking is legal and does not harm others, who can argue with another’s “right” to smoke?  Certainly not me.

Here’s a list of cities in Mississippi and their smoking ban status:

  • Gulfport, May 1, 2008.
  • Grenada, May, 2008.
  • Corinth, November 2007 Board of Aldermen adopted a public smoking ban that encompasses city-owned facilities, enclosed public places, employment places and some outdoor areas.
  • Greenville, banned in all indoor public places, including restaurants and bars
  • Greenwood, August 23, 2007 banned in all workplaces, restaurants, and bars.
  • Hattiesburg, January 1, 2007 banned in all indoor public places, including bars, restaurants, and city buildings.
  • Lucedale, December, 2007, rejected a ban on smoking in all enclosed workplaces
  • Oxford, banned in all indoor public places, including bars, restaurants, and city buildings. Smoking is also prohibited in certain outdoor areas.
  • Ridgeland, July 20, 2007 banned in all workplaces, restaurants, and bars.
  • Starkville, May 20, 2006 banned in all indoor public places, including bars, restaurants, and city buildings. Smoking is also prohibited in certain outdoor areas.
  • Tupelo, October 2006 banned in all indoor public places, including restaurants and bars.

Source:  Wikipedia list of Smoking Bans in United States.

3 responses to “Smoking Bans in Cities

  1. Pingback: Smoking Bans in Cities Phil Hardwicks Weblog | Quit Smoking Plan!

  2. Pingback: Smoking Bans in Cities Phil Hardwicks Weblog | End Smoking using Hypnosis

  3. http://tobaccoanalysis.blogspot.com/2006/09/pueblo-study-concludes-that-smoking.html

    does an excellent job of showing the sort of poor research and sheer propaganda that underlies most of these studies. For another good example all one has to do is visit the Grandaddy Heart Miracle Study of them all: the Helena study in the BMJ. Check out the Rapid Responses and see how over a dozen significant problems, questions, and defects are posed to the study authors and see how they’ve simply been ignored. See:

    http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/eletters/bmj.38055.715683.55v1

    If these studies were legitimate the researchers behind them would be hopping right up to home plate in an instant to defend their work and answer the questions raised. Instead they’ve spent years wandering around the countryside, grabbing microphones and giving talks for probably very handsome “honorariums” touting their miraculous findings and pretending there’s no serious questioning of them.

    The fact that there was no separation of smokers and nonsmokers in most of these studies should raise an INSTANT red flag: when was the last time that anyone in this country ever had a heart attack where their smoking status wasn’t made part of their medical record? What possible reason could there be for not including such basic data in the study? Simple: if the data had been included then the study’s main conclusion (that bans protect nonsmokers from heart attacks) would have been invalidated and the grant money would have disappeared.

    Michael J. McFadden
    Author of “Dissecting Antismokers’ Brains”

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